Body Language for Your Interviews

At GPAC, Growing Companies and People, we want to connect you with the perfect interview and position so that you can soar in the career of your choice. This process begins before we have set up even one interview for you. It starts now, in how you prepare yourself for an interview.

We have found that a significant component of an interview is body language.

Here are some do’s and don’ts for your interviews so we can match you up with that perfect job:

DON’T:

  1. Don’t lean back. When you are sitting and answering questions or telling a prospective new employer your background, do not lean back. Although this stature may appear relaxed on the outside, it communicates boredom and restlessness. An employer may connect that with a general lack of assertiveness which they would not want in an employee.
  2. Don’t lean forward, either. Although leaning forward sometimes communicates an eagerness to learn or listen, many times it can suggest over-aggressiveness.
  3. Don’t close your arms in front of your chest. This is a universal sign for “I am closed off.” If your potential employer sees you do this, they may assume that you are closed to new thought and therefore won’t take criticism.
  4. Don’t play with your hair, fingernails or jewelry. Even though you may do one of these as a normal tic or gesture, it will communicate that you are nervous. The one who is hiring will take note of this and may perceive it as showing that you are fearful. Therefore, you might be afraid to take risks at your new job.

DO:

  1. Do practice your handshake. When you meet a hiring manager, you want to show them you’re professional and confident. Luckily, you can send this message right away by having a firm handshake. For decades recruiters and professionals have advised job seekers to have a confident handshake, and this advice is just as applicable today as it was then. If you’re worried you have a weak handshake, ask to practice with some friends.
  2. Do make eye contact. Look your interviewer in the eyes but don’t stare. If you find you need to look away, do it as you talk so that the eye movement will communicate that you are thinking through your answer. Maintain your eye contact when your interviewer is talking or asking a question. If you have a panel-based interview, look around at each of the panel members equally.
  3. Do balance your voice and body language. It is wonderful to be enthusiastic if your voice and your body reinforces that. If your body language is high energy, but your voice is sleepy or monotone, it will confuse your interviewer. An animated voice with no movement can look a bit odd and confuse your interviewer as to whether you want the job or not.
  4. Do carry one bag. It might sound silly, but if you come into the interview carrying multiple items, it may look as if you are disorganized and you don’t want that to be the first impression you make.

Begin now to think through and even practice your body language for future interviews. By simply controlling your movements and your voice, you increase your chances to land that perfect job!

 

Source:

http://www.forbes.com/sites/meghancasserly/2012/09/26/10-body-language-tics-that-could-cost-you-the-interview-and-the-job/#1e0e40b48a3d

https://www.ziprecruiter.com/blog/first-impressions-count-improve-your-job-interview-body-language/

http://www.timewisejobs.co.uk/article/getting-body-language-on-message-during-interview/

http://www.scienceofpeople.com/2013/02/the-best-body-language-for-job-interviews/

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